Root canal – 8 answers to understand when to see a dentist

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Root canal – 8 answers to understand when to see a dentist

Root canal – 8 answers to understand when to see a dentist

Author Mike Haghour - 26 October 2018
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When does my tooth need root canal treatment?

Every tooth has one or more roots. In the roots are small channels and ramifications. In it are small blood vessels and nerves that form the dental pulp, colloquially also referred to as “nerve”.

What happens with root inflammation?

As the pulp becomes inflamed, the pressure inside the tooth increases, blood flow stops and the tissue dies. Often very severe pain occurs here. The cause of such an inflammation is often caries, as this causes bacteria to reach the interior of the tooth.

Why can you not just leave an inflamed tooth untreated?

The bacteria penetrate ever deeper into the inflamed tooth and can cause purulent inflammation in the jawbone. Such inflammation can cause serious health problems.

What does the dentist do with a root canal treatment?

Root inflammation can not be cured with antibiotics. Following local anesthesia, the tooth can be drilled out painlessly and the inflamed tissue removed. For this, the dentist uses small hones. The channels are then disinfected and later drained and tightly filled.root canal treatment

Why do you often have to visit a dentist several times?

Depending on the tooth, it can be difficult to find the channels in a short time and to clean them properly. In addition, between the appointments drug deposits are introduced into the channels to disinfect the tooth.

Why can a tooth be painful despite root canal treatment?

Since teeth have different shapes, it can happen that certain channels can not be properly filled by curvature or the like. Thus, it can come to the root tips to inflammation in the surrounding bone. Even if the tooth is “dead”.

Why should teeth be crowned after root canal filling?

The lack of blood flow and drilling makes the tooth brittle. Crowns therefore ensure long-term stability.

When should a root-treated tooth be crowned?

Usually at the earliest 6 months after root filling. For severely damaged teeth, a temporary crown can be made before the 6 months have expired to protect the tooth from further damage.

 

 

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Mike Haghour

Mike Haghour

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